AHNE Bryniau Clwyd / Clwydian Range AONB

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Corwen

The little market town of Corwen is set between a wide sweep of the River Dee and the foot of the Berwyns, with the steep wooded slope of Pen-y-Pigyn as a backdrop. The focus of ancient routes from London to Holyhead and Chester to Bala, this “Crossroads of North Wales” was a centre for cattle-drovers and a favourite with Victorian travellers, as several notable town-centre buildings still testify.

Owain Glyndwr staute in CorwenBut Corwen's origins are far older. Its name means “the White Choir” or “White Church”, referring to the church founded here by the 6th century saints Mael and Sulien, perhaps on a prehistoric pagan site: the Iron Age hillfort of Caer Drewyn crowns the hill across the river.

The present medieval and later church has many fascinating features, including a lintel stone marked with a “dagger cross” - traditionally cut by the thrown knife of Corwen's most renowned son, the great medieval Welsh hero Owain Glyndwr. Glyndwr's Mount, where he proclaimed himself Prince of Wales in 1400, stands seven miles east beside the A5 road. Rug Chapel and Llangar Church are also nearby, and Corwen is an ideal base for exploring the Upper Dee Valley and the Berwyns.


Discovering Corwen

Discovering Corwen

Explore the beauty, history and wildlife of Corwen and the railway stations in the Dee Valley.

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Exploring Corwen leaflet

Exploring Corwen leaflet

A fascinating town trail, a list of interesting facts, a history of Owain Glyndwr and signposts to nearby places of interest including Rug Chapel and Llangar Church.

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Discover Corwen’s Countryside booklet

Discover Corwen’s Countryside booklet

 Five walks revealing the beauty, history and wildlife of Corwen.

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